white TIGER moths

Giant Leopard moth, found at Germantown MetroPark on June 12, 2016. The hollow, black-rimmed white spots are distinctive.

Salt Marsh Moth. Don't be fooled by the name; this species is found in a wide variety of habitats and is not restricted to wetlands. Notice the black, square-shaped wedges along the edge of its wing. Photographed August 14, 2014. 

Virginian Tiger moth. This is an abundant and widespread species. I have found them in good numbers every month from late April through September (and also one late sighting on November 6th). Virginian Tiger moths are usually pure white except for two small black dots.

Agreeable Tiger moth. These are less common than Virginian Tiger moths, and they usually have more tiny black dots on their wings. I have found Agreeable Tiger moths from late April through July. 

Fall Webworm moths can be either pure white or heavily spotted with black dots. The mated pair at left has one of each type. 

This is a more worn and battered example of a Giant Leopard moth. These moths often lose some of their scales, resulting in clear patches on the wings. This species flies in June and July.

This is the spotted variety of Fall Webworm. This species is abundant from late April through August.

Another Agreeable Tiger moth. Notice that the abdomen is pure white. A Virginian Tiger moth would have yellow patches and black spots on its abdomen.  

This is the pure white form of the Fall Webworm. It might be mistaken for a Virginian Tiger, but Fall Webworms are slightly smaller.   

Finally, here is a Pink-legged Tiger Moth! The reason for the name is obvious (although to be honest, the legs look more red than pink to me). 

I found this Pink-legged Tiger Moth at my lights on June 13, 2020. It is the only one I have ever seen. 

Virginian Tiger moths have yellow and black spots on their abdomens. This feature is important for distinguishing them from close look-alikes such as the Agreeable Tiger and Fall Webworm (below).